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. >> next a look at the fbi and its role in investigating cyber related crimes. from this morning's "washington journal" this is about 45 minutes. >> this week's segment involving your money will look at the fbi's role in fighting cyber crimes. and we are talking about-based terrorism, espionage. computer intrusions, major cyber fraud. will learn a little bit, then we will get to your calls and will learn a little bit first from shawn henry, who was the fbi's executive director for criminal and cyber programs. and been in a peer for quite a number of years by thank you for joining us. >> thanks are having. spent first of all what exactly is a cybercrime? >> when you talk about cyber, i think danger to any type of criminal activity that involves the use of the computer i think that's what most people talk about. when i talk about cybercrime on focusing on intrusions into computer networks. so those networks that we all use every single day come to increase efficiency and effectiveness in and our productivity. but those very same things that make those networks were effective for us
to the pentagon and ig on the one hand and to the fbi with regards to general petraeus. >> but he's not, i mean big picture watching this, shaking his head saying, guys, we need a more sense of leadership here? >> he's not going to make a grand pronouncement or decisions about things based on, you know, two situations, two individual cases. he's focused on the missions that the military's tasked with carrying out and the cia and the general intelligence community tasked with carrying out, and with acting overall agenda which encompasses not just national security policy, but obviously domestic policy. >> thank you. >> yes. >> jay, has the president spoke to general allen directly? >> not that i'm aware of, no. >> spoke with secretary panetta? >> i have to check that. secretary panetta has been traveling. >> as a follow-up question, does the president see this in general as an unwelcomed distraction at a time when she's just -- was re-elected, and he has a bunch of priorities in terms of the fiscal cliff and in terms of the cabinet? >> well, i certainly, i think wouldn't call it welcome, but obv
of the fbi's cyber division. he held the highest ranking position in the fbi's cyber division, and he will be playing, um, the fbi director. so we have general cartwright playing the role of national security adviser, bill lynn is the secretary of defense -- um, this is perfect because it's halloween, so it's kind of even easier to play roles. [laughter] and we have steve to bin sky head of the fbi. and on your, on your screens you'll also see when your names come up, you'll see the roles that they're playing, and on your table we also have the agenda. and dmitri is the co-founder and chief technology officer for cloud strike, he's a computer security researcher, he helps focus business and governments on how to protect their intellectual property. and dmitri is going to play the role of the ceo of the oil company that gets hit in this exercise. dmitri is on the final end. and we have james lewis beside him, he's a senior fellow and program director for csis, he's worked at the state department and commerce, and he's a leading global expert on cyber. in 2010 he was with the united nat
and there. petty thefts but it was adding up and it's a federal crime. so the fbi staked out these trucks and filmed them stealing. we pulled the trucks back to the loading dock in oklahoma. these are trucks from koch industry, trucks that had an agreement that they were just cheating. it wasn't just driver stealing off the top and selling them to broke broque ers. not exact but because on the loading dock a big tall white guy was standing there saying i want more, more overage. now overage, term used for the skim and the guy standing there calling for more ore bridge was charles should -- charles koch i have one question as an investigator. the guy was already worth billions at that time. today he's worth over $20 billion. he got it from his daddy who had built oil refineries for joe stalin and made a billion and came back to the u.s. and founded the john birch society so the koch brothers got their money field fascist way. silvie already had his billions, so why? why does he need a couple of bucks from a poor indian family in the middle of oklahoma? and i know the answer because the s
's going to be an 8.2% across-the-board cut in education, job training and health, housing, fbi, air traffic controllers from the food safety, entire range of domestic programs. for education if you count headstart, which is at the department of health and human services a $4.8 billion cut would be the largest education cuts ever in the history of the country. that would just move us -- essentially move us backwards on whether the goal is closing achievement gaps come increasing high school graduation rates, increasing college access and college completion. our biggest challenge in the short-term this lame-duck lame-duck session this to work together with groups like the urban league and national council to come up with a balanced approach to deficit reduction. as genocide, as people who can pay more to do so without balancing the budget on the backs of children and students and working people and low-income people. the other cop couple quick things i want to say is we are facing increased enrollment expected to go to the next decade, both of elementary secondary level. we have now 2
on the specifics of the investigation. the fbi has its own protocols in terms of how they proceed. and i'm going to let director mueller and others examine those protocols, and make some statements to the public generally. i do want to emphasize what i said before. general petraeus had an extraordinary career. deserved this country with great distinction in iraq, in afghanistan, and as head of the cia. by his own assessment, he did not meet the standards that he felt were necessary as the director of cia with respect to this personal matter that he is now dealing with, with his family, and with his wife. and it's on that basis that he tendered his resignation, and it's on that basis that i accepted it. but i want to emphasize that from my perspective at least, he has provided this country and extraordinary service. we are safer because of the work that dave petraeus has done, and my main hope right now is that he and his family are able to move on, and that this instead of being -- this into a being a single side note on what has been otherwise been an extraordinary career. [inaudible] >> you kn
in education and job-training and health and housing and the fbi coming air-traffic control, food safety, an entire range of domestic programs. for education that can't be what you count head start for the department of health and human services. it's to be about a $4.8 billion cut, the largest education cut ever in history of the country that would move us further essentially move us backwards on whether the goal is closing achievement gap, increasing high school graduation rates, increasing kawlija access and college completion so our biggest challenge in the short term is to work together with groups like the urban league and the national council of la raza and others to come up with a balanced approach on the deficit reduction and as janet said, ask people who can afford to pay a lot more to do so without balancing the budget on the backs of children and students and working people and low-income people. there's a couple quick things i want to say that we are also facing increasing enrollment expected to go up in the next decade with the elementary and secondary level even faster tha
. the trustees began by asking former fbi director free to lead an independent investigation which yielded 119 recommendations on how to enhance our internal policies and practices. we've already implemented more than one-third of the recommendations, and many more are nearing completion. we remain p committed to the process because we believe it made us a better, stronger university. we're committed to the fight against child abuse. central to this effort is the newly established center for the protection of children based at the penn state hershey hospital and ongoing partnership with the pennsylvania coalition against rape. earlier this week, we completed the first penn state national conference on child sexual abuse. this forum, brought together leaders, experts from law enforcement, pediatric medicine, prevention research, and education. we formed the penn state network for child protection a and well being comprised of 35 faculty members with interdisciplinary expertise with the aim to accelerate the pace of discovery by linking research and practice and build the network with additional
states and defeated an incumbent president by a larger margin than fbi and -- at tiahrt and herbert hoover. he did among the various subgroups the women, african-americans, asians, hispanics, 18 to 29 and so forth and you overly his performance in 1980 over this electorate, he loses by the same amount that rahm needed -- romney did. this is a long-term problem for the party. the country is becoming more diverse. of the country's aging, and this is going to present some challenges for the party. i am relatively optimistic that they can find ways to build bridges to those voters that they need to get about it now. >> ralph you talk about demographics and we have other panelists we have ever heard from yet but since you were leaving early i want to ask you haven't mentioned the issue free of the conversation and the christian conservative community. it does seem to me to have a role. can you talk about foreign policy or the individuals and how the christian community is now with the conservative christian community is looking at those issues? >> we are still looking at a post-election
more problematic. i think one of the other panelists mentioned this quote from fbi director, and you see the same concerns of talking about in the commercial sphere, to. he said basically set to every company is being hacked one way or another and it's not a question of when they will be hacked. it will be a question of when it will happen again. that might be a pessimistic view of how bitter cybersecurity sector can be. it is certainly a theme you see in the space. my only point, the only other point i want to make on commercial data is that you see and report. there was a report issued by verizon about data breach investigation, that suggests that a lease in endears large numbers of serious cyber intrusions intrusions have been aimed at create taking authentication credential, passwords, usernames, things like that. things that can be used for later inclusion's in the future, things that might give an intruder broader access to a network. so i'd like to shift for a moment, those ideas in mind, and talk about offense of cyber operations. and what do we mean by that and what is, what
or the fbi undercover and lo and behold that was just a front so that they could defend themselves when actually they were committing fraud and criminal activity. lastly i would conclude mr. griffin and dr. burgess indicated certainly if you have the ability to go in and prosecute and take the computers from necc then surely you have the jurisdiction to shut them down because you have the jurisdiction to go in and take their equipment and certainly i think many of us on this committee are disappointed that you are not providing the e-mails and the information we need so we can get to the bottom of this and that was the intention of this whole hearing is to see what really happened. with that, the subcommittee is adjourned. [inaudible conversations] by military trainers at the lakeland air force base in texas. this 40 minute briefing in chases 45 policy changes being enacted at lakeland which is the home of all air force basic training. >> good afternoon and thank you for making time to be with us here today. i'm joined by major general woodard who is assigned to air force safety here at
was crawling with fbi agents. everybody knew because they were wearing tweed jackets. a terrible thing to wear in santa fe. some real serious espionage went on. that is great drama. i went to santa fe to walk around the streets that characters walk around. i find that very hopeful. >> i wondered when i came to buffalo with a you had gone to buffalo. >> oh yes. a couple times i have been to buffalo. the other thing is buffalo features heavily in the first book, and 1 hundred years ago was a very different place from what it is like today. nevertheless i went and looked around but i got ahold of old maps, the buffalo blue book which was the list of high society people in town, got newspapers that were published in newspapers published at the time and walking around is never enough, but it is a good basis. >> gives you a feel for the place. in doing research, it is one thing if you do your research but are you able to do your own research in a book like this that covers so much? >> i have to do it. other people wouldn't know what i was looking for. i do have helped in finding stuff. i use a resea
are not having a war on your orders and making sure the international community sends billions of fbi success and making sure that the people see results for their elections, and political success is making sure that hamas and gaza doesn't govern the relationship with egypt but that egypt governs the relationship with a hamas. if this is the root of the government of egypt pursues, then the potential for the working relationship with israel is possible. if it tries to achieve political success in the it the logical means, then we in the united states will be in a very difficult position and the israelis will be in an even more difficult position. .. >> you have a question earlier. no? okay, howard. >> ten years ago we were frantically trying to buy stinger missiles in bosnia should probably gotten there from afghanistan. the question i have come is if we do consider legal support to the syria and freedom fighters, how do we manage especially when it comes to no presence at all, how do we manage to control where those go and how they might get used? >> when i made a reference to seeing the nee
use on the fbi's most wanted list. is responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew what he was. there's no evidence to suggest that. it's hard to prove negligence but with 6000 doctors from the bin laden compound that has been transited if it was a smoking gun i would be interested in ambassador munter's observation. if there was a smoking gun, our observation on oscar we would not a pointed it out publicly at this point. >> you know, the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no more than they say. [laughter] but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] >> know, there is now evidence that i've seen that there was high level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know, you can be accused of incompetence and this was a domestic issue for the pakistan military and intelligence but that's a different question than we're talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence a new he was there during the time. >> al qaeda tried to kill general musharra
the fbi that is the national organization that has the resources to do the things that local jurisdictions, whether state or local don't have the resources to do. i believe that it's possible to have speed you can see this "washington journal" segment at our website, c-span.org. live now to the senate floor on foreign relations for remarks from the recommendations commission chair julius genachowski. is expected to discuss international telecommunications policy. this is just getting underway. >> very excited to be here today. is perhaps the most anticipated cfr event and much as the new james bond movie. i'm glad that chairman could join us today. just a quick introduction, prior to his fcc opponent, chairman genachowski was chief of business operations before that general counsel at iac interactive corp., special advisor and cofounder of the technology incubator lunchbox digital. his full bio is in your packages. i will turn over to the chairman for some quick opening remarks. we'll been going to the conversation where i follow up with some questions, and then after that we will open up
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15